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    The data was collected in three districts (Kersa, Omonada and Bako-Tibe) in Oromia regional state, Southwestern Ethiopia. The data was collected from 228 farmers during October-November 2015. The questionaire was developed after a series of focus group discussions and key informant interviews in the study area.

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    The first part of the dissertation deals with the dynamics of assets owned by the household head, his spouse, or jointly by both in response to diverse shocks in rural agricultural households in Bangladesh, one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. Therefore, a unique and detailed country representing household survey panel data is used, known as ‘Bangladesh Climate Change Adaptation Survey’ of 2010 and 2012. Looking at changes within rather than between households, the research shows that land is owned mostly by men, who are also wealthier than their spouses. By constructing a comprehensive index the overall effect on wealth is investigated, which does not exist in the literature yet. The results suggest that husband’s and wife’s asset holdings respond differently depending on the type of shocks. Weather shocks such as cyclones adversely affect the asset holdings of household heads in general, while predicted external events such as seasonal droughts and dowry payments reduce assets of both spouses. The results suggest that jointly owned assets are not sold in response to shocks; either due to these assets being actively protected or due to the difficulty of agreeing on this coping strategy. Women’s asset holdings and associated choices of substituting assets are shaped by their lesser involvement in agriculture. To know the changes of behavioral patterns in response to these shocks, the results suggest that households are more likely to adopt short-term coping mechanisms in response to non-climatic negative shocks rather than to climatic shocks, whereas households are more likely engage in adaptation strategies in response to the latter. Furthermore, adaptation strategies are often combined complementary efforts, whereas coping mechanisms are mutually independent across the study. In particular, group participation in general is associated with crop adaptation strategies and perceptions of climate change among women. Finally, the research seeks to explore the potential of group based approaches which is receiving a growing attention due to their possible role in securing household welfare in the presence of adverse events. The inherent endogeneity is addressed by using instrumental variables. The results suggest that household heads mainly participate in groups that are welfare augmenting and income enhancing, while their spouses are mainly active in credit groups due to less personal wealth which are more strongly negatively affected by shocks. Furthermore, evidence is found for a positive association of social and political capital with household-level welfare and with asset holdings of the household head. Interestingly, it seems that this effect is not driven by mere participation in groups, but also by other aspects of social capital, for example informal networks, of both household heads and spouses.

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    A survey of agricultural households was conducted in early 2011 in order to provide background information on landownership, size of operation, rice production, input use, and farm practices in rural communities, as well as to identify and assess existing climate change adaptation strategies. A resurvey was conducted in late 2012 to build on the initial round of the survey, known as the Bangladesh Climate Change Adaptation Survey, with a greater focus on gender and asset dynamics. We tried to track all the households including the split with an attrition rate of 2.66 percent.e this template for data such as statistics, surveys, etc.

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    The data set contains registered land leases obtained by mostly private individuals in the Upper West Region from 1976 to 2013. The data covers the sections or communities and districts where the land transactions took place.

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    The survey covers 227 small holder maize growing farmers in Bako, Jimma Arjo and Yayu in the Oromia region. The baseline information covers the farming household characteristics (fam size, sources of income, education levels etc), maize and livestock production challenges, access to extension and markets.

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    The data set was collected from one year field research (2017-2018) in two sites in Vietnam, including: The Complex of Monuments in Hue, Thua Thien-Hue Province; and the Phong Nha - Ke Bang National Park in Quang Binh Province. It includes primary and secondary data sources. Primary source was collected from semi-structured, in-depth interveriews, and focus group discussions. Focus aspects contains the different networks and flows of heritage-making in the two sites. Participated informants ranges from governmental officers (of different levels), tour providers, accommodation providers, tourguides, experts, and local community. Secondary sources is extracted from policies, regulation documents, and other virual data sources. The data was used for the Doctoral project that was funded by the German Academic Exchange Services (DAAD) from 2015 to 2020.

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    One of the traditional livelihood practices of indigenous Tagbanuas in Palawan, Philippines is wild honey gathering from the giant honey bee. In order to analyse the linkages of the social and ecological systems involved in this indigenous practice, we conducted spatial, quantitative, and qualitative analysis on field data gathered through GPS mapping, community surveys, focus group discussions, and key informant interviews. We found that only 24% of the 251 local community members surveyed could correctly identify the giant honey bee. Inferential statistics showed that a lower level of education and higher household vegetation contribute to correct identification of the giant honey bee. Spatial analysis revealed that mean NDVI of sampled nesting tree areas has dropped from 0.61 in the year 1988 to 0.41 in 2015. This reduction on vegetation cover may contribute to reduced bee-human interactions and may also be an indication that commercialising non-timber forest products is not fulfiling its objective of development alongside conservation. Indigenous wild honey hunting and gathering as an ICDP shows the complexity of the social-ecological system of forest communities. It also shows the difficulty of getting a win-win situation out of simultaneous pursuit of forest conservation and rural development. Knowledge shifts can, indeed, occur from the interaction of ecological and social factors and we see that if resource management interventions do not employ a systems approach, it can overlook important feedback. NGO interventions should not only facilitate the learning of visible resource managers like wild honey hunters but of the community as a whole.

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    The ZEF Data Management Policy declares principles and rules for the management of research data generated by scientists working at the Center for Development Research (ZEF), University of Bonn. Based on ZEF's data management goals and principles, the legal framework for the management of rights on data, spanning from intellectual property to privacy protection, is outlined. With reference to the legal framework the individual rights and commitments of ZEF scientists regarding the provision, the re-use and the management of ZEF data are described in detail. Citation and acknowledgment rules are specified as well. The document is available in English and German. 14 pages.