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    Data on investment licenses from Ethiopia's Licensing office in Addis Abeba (Feb 2011). For each investment, country of origin, requested land size, some information on planned production, as well as employment and capital is contained (N=2814). Data quality: This data-set was received from the Ethiopian Investment Authority during a field visit in 2011. It contains data from investors that invested in the agricultural sector and requested some land. Unfortunately the land size information was very noisy (Units not clearly specified and missing values). Some land was requested in ha, some in sq.m. Processing: The data set attached was filtered based on size-capital assumptions, leaving out those investments that are purely processing (less land intensive). A cut-off point of 100 ha was chosen and 2814 observations for the period 1992 to Dec 2010 remained. This data set was used for Baumgartner (2012) Large-scale investments in Ethiopia, in (eds.) Allan et al.: Handbook of Land and Water Grabs in Africa, Routledge; and in Baumgartner et al. (2015) Poverty impacts of Large-scale land acquisitions, WDev.

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    The survey covers 227 small holder maize growing farmers in Bako, Jimma Arjo and Yayu in the Oromia region. The baseline information covers the farming household characteristics (fam size, sources of income, education levels etc), maize and livestock production challenges, access to extension and markets.

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    The data was collected in three districts (Kersa, Omonada and Bako-Tibe) in Oromia regional state, Southwestern Ethiopia. The data was collected from 228 farmers during October-November 2015. The questionaire was developed after a series of focus group discussions and key informant interviews in the study area.

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    Questionnaire were administered to 4 slum communities in Lagos: Ajegunle (203), Iwaya (75), Itire (54) and Ikorodu (52), to determine the movement pattern of slum dwellers, factors influencing the residential choices and reasons of the people to remain in Lagos slums/squatter communities. The sample unit was a household, and the respondent was generally the household head, or alternatively the oldest family member available older than 18 years. The data was processed using SPSS.