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    Environmental Democracy Index (EDI) consists of 75 legal indicators developed under 23 of the UNEP Bali Guidelines that are concerned with the development and implementation of legislation. In addition to the legal indicators, EDI includes 24 supplemental indicators that assess whether there is evidence that environmental democracy is being implemented in practice. The EDI legal indicators assess laws, constitutions, regulations and other legally binding, enforceable rules at the national level scores. TRANSPARENCY Pillar contains following Guidelines:- Guideline 1: "Accessibility of Environmental Information Requests" ? Guideline 2: "Environmental Information in Public Domain" ? Guideline 3: "Grounds for Refusal" ? Guideline 4: "Environmental Information Collection and Management" ? Guideline 5: "State of the Environment Report" ? Guideline 6: "Early Warning Information" ? Guideline 7: "Capacity-building for access to information (There are no indicators for this guideline)"

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    Macro level data (annual) for Indian food grain sector. Based on secondary data

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    The table includes annual data of yield and production of Maize and Cassava at Regional (Ashanti and Brong-Ahafo) and site specific (Kumasi, Ejura, Dorma Ahenko, Nkoranza, Techiman) level.

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    The data included were collected from three villages of Chongqing, China in 2011. Topics related to land rental market participation were the theme of survey.

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    Agronomic Fertilizer Use Efficiency (FUE) for maize grain yield across the Ethiopia has been estimated using crop model LINTUL5 embedded into the modeling framework SIMPLACE (Scientific Impact Assessment and Modelling Platform for Advanced Crop and Ecosystem Management.

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    This set of interviews is part of the 'Farmer Empowerment' project that focused on the impact of farmer organizations (FOs) on the socio-economic development of their FO-members. The interviews were conducted within a second field research in order to gather information on specific impact pathways of selected FOs that work to empower respective FO-members.

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    The file was developed to assess the performance of a novel bamboo-drip irrigation system in laboratory and in field conditions, in South-west Benin. The assessment was conducted in terms of hydraulics, uniformity, yield, water productivity and soil-water management.

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    The persistence of poverty in some parts of the society across the globe inspired recent studies in development economics to embrace the use of multidisciplinary tools and concepts to better understand the situation of the poor. This thesis employs one of the recent conceptual tools, the aspirations-failure framework, which links the situation of the poor and their (under)investment behavior to aspirations failure. Based on individual and household level data collected from a sample of farm households in rural Ethiopia, the thesis first econometrically examines the effect of social interactions on aspirations (with respect to income, wealth, social status and education). The findings are in line with the theory which suggests that aspirations are socially determined through observations and social interactions. In particular, results indicate that social network size is an important determinant of aspirations and especially that of women’s, attesting to the importance of widening the ‘aspirations window’ – a person’s cognitive world that shapes their aspirations. One of the channels in which aspirations may affect behavior is through their effect on risk aversion. The thesis finds that the ‘aspirations-gap’ (AG) – the difference between the aspired and present status – indeed relaxes risk aversion, and the association is non-linear. Results also indicate that the effect of AG on risk preferences is stronger for women. Social interactions may also enhance diffusion of innovations and productivity. Based on social networks data collected using ‘random matching within sample’ procedure, the thesis identifies strong evidence of network externalities in the adoption of row-planting and also in farm productivity. The novelty of the thesis is also the identification of aspirations (or AG) as one of the key determinants of farmer innovativeness or the adoption of innovation products such as chemical fertilizers. The main goal of the thesis is ultimately to try to understand the implications of aspirations by examining their interactions not only with the underlying drivers of well-being (such as the adoption of agricultural innovations and risk behavior) but also their interactions with the well-being outcomes themselves. The thesis uses various outcome indicators including income and consumption expenditure, various triangulating measures of food security, and subjective well-being defined in terms of life satisfaction and happiness. In nearly all outcome indicators, the thesis finds suggestive evidence that aspirations are important predictors of household well-being in rural Ethiopia. The overall findings of the thesis clearly demonstrate that beyond the resource-related deprivations, low aspirations also play a role in rural households’ decision-making in Ethiopia, with consequences on well-being outcomes. Targeting the determinants of aspirations may therefore be a useful policy strategy.

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    Questionnaire were administered to 4 slum communities in Lagos: Ajegunle (203), Iwaya (75), Itire (54) and Ikorodu (52), to determine the movement pattern of slum dwellers, factors influencing the residential choices and reasons of the people to remain in Lagos slums/squatter communities. The sample unit was a household, and the respondent was generally the household head, or alternatively the oldest family member available older than 18 years. The data was processed using SPSS.

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    Microsoft World files contain several sheets that list statistical crop data of Ghana (per year). Crops (2000 to 2012): Maize, Rice, Millet, Sorghum, Cassava, Cocoyam, Yam, Plantain, G’nuts, Oil Palm, Beans Crops (1970 to 2004): Maize, Rice, Millet, Sorghum, Cassava, Cocoyam, Yam, Plantain, Groundnuts, Coconut, Oil Palm, Beans, Tomatoes, Pepper, Okro, Garden Egg, Banana, Orange, Pineapple, Sugar-Cane Source: Statistics, Research & Information Directorate (SRID), Min. of Food and Agriculture (MoFA) 2013.